Google Tames the Sea of Information

Google’s original business was creating algorithms to help people sort quickly through the rapidly growing amount of content being put online. Rather than employ editors and researchers to curate links for specific queries, Google began building algorithms that scored the content it was indexing against specific criteria.

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Google Tames the Sea of Information

Google’s original business was creating algorithms to help people sort quickly through the rapidly growing amount of content being put online. Rather than employ editors and researchers to curate links for specific queries, Google began building algorithms that scored the content it was indexing against specific criteria.


These included novel concepts like inbound links from trusted sources as well as standard measures like keyword frequency and page titles. All of these pieces came together in a Page Rank that decided where a site would display on a specific query.


Using this scoring approach, Google was able to serve up more accurate results than many of the existing search engines that preceded it in the market. The algorithm was—and still is—being constantly tweaked and updated to give users the most relevant results. Because it started strong and just kept getting better and better, Google became the go-to search engine for the Internet in the space of a few years.


Becoming a Digital Powerhouse

With the ad piece in place to complement search, Google began to innovate in earnest. Some moves were obvious, such as Google publishing and acquiring digital assets that would deliver more ad-driven revenue as traffic grew and more ad space as content increased. These included YouTube (acquired 2006), Google Maps (2005), Google Blogger (2003), and Google Finance (2006).


However, Google also created a number of sites and web apps that weren’t initially built to be monetized through ads. Google Books falls into this latter category as it is a repository of books online with ads playing a very small role. Similarly, ads are hard to find on Google News, a real-time collection of current content from thousands of news sources. Gmail (2004) started out ad-free and cost-free, but newer iterations give the user the choice between free with ads or paid without ads. The first versions of all these sites were far from perfection. Google put up the beta versions and then allowed users to find and prioritize the improvements to be included in the next version. Google Tames the Sea of Information

Google’s original business was creating algorithms to help people sort quickly through the rapidly growing amount of content being put online. Rather than employ editors and researchers to curate links for specific queries, Google began building algorithms that scored the content it was indexing against specific criteria.


These included novel concepts like inbound links from trusted sources as well as standard measures like keyword frequency and page titles. All of these pieces came together in a Page Rank that decided where a site would display on a specific query.


Using this scoring approach, Google was able to serve up more accurate results than many of the existing search engines that preceded it in the market. The algorithm was—and still is—being constantly tweaked and updated to give users the most relevant results. Because it started strong and just kept getting better and better, Google became the go-to search engine for the Internet in the space of a few years.


Becoming a Digital Powerhouse

With the ad piece in place to complement search, Google began to innovate in earnest. Some moves were obvious, such as Google publishing and acquiring digital assets that would deliver more ad-driven revenue as traffic grew and more ad space as content increased. These included YouTube (acquired 2006), Google Maps (2005), Google Blogger (2003), and Google Finance (2006).


However, Google also created a number of sites and web apps that weren’t initially built to be monetized through ads. Google Books falls into this latter category as it is a repository of books online with ads playing a very small role. Similarly, ads are hard to find on Google News, a real-time collection of current content from thousands of news sources. Gmail (2004) started out ad-free and cost-free, but newer iterations give the user the choice between free with ads or paid without ads. The first versions of all these sites were far from perfection. Google put up the beta versions and then allowed users to find and prioritize the improvements to be included in the next version.

Using this scoring approach, Google was able to serve up more accurate results than many of the existing search engines that preceded it in the market. The algorithm was—and still is—being constantly tweaked and updated to give users the most relevant results. Because it started strong and just kept getting better and better, Google became the go-to search engine for the Internet in the space of a few years.


Becoming a Digital Powerhouse

With the ad piece in place to complement search, Google began to innovate in earnest. Some moves were obvious, such as Google publishing and acquiring digital assets that would deliver more ad-driven revenue as traffic grew and more ad space as content increased. These included YouTube (acquired 2006), Google Maps (2005), Google Blogger (2003), and Google Finance (2006).


However, Google also created a number of sites and web apps that weren’t initially built to be monetized through ads. Google Books falls into this latter category as it is a repository of books online with ads playing a very small role. Similarly, ads are hard to find on Google News, a real-time collection of current content from thousands of news sources. Gmail (2004) started out ad-free and cost-free, but newer iterations give the user the choice between free with ads or paid without ads. The first versions of all these sites were far from perfection. Google put up the beta versions and then allowed users to find and prioritize the improvements to be included in the next version.